5 rows where author_number = 1

View and edit SQL

Suggested facets: subject, references-count, is-referenced-by-count, ISSN, container-title, orcids, award_numbers, funder_names, created (date), subject (array), ISSN (array), orcids (array), names (array), award_numbers (array), funder_names (array)

funder_dois

Link rowid ▼ title DOI URL created subject references-count is-referenced-by-count ISSN container-title abstract author_number orcids names award_numbers funder_names funder_dois
1 ["Human gut microbiome: hopes, threats and promises"] 10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316723 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2018-316723 2018-06-22T16:20:25Z ["Gastroenterology"] 132 230 ["0017-5749", "1468-3288"] Gut <jats:p>The microbiome has received increasing attention over the last 15 years. Although gut microbes have been explored for several decades, investigations of the role of microorganisms that reside in the human gut has attracted much attention beyond classical infectious diseases. For example, numerous studies have reported changes in the gut microbiota during not only obesity, diabetes, and liver diseases but also cancer and even neurodegenerative diseases. The human gut microbiota is viewed as a potential source of novel therapeutics. Between 2013 and 2017, the number of publications focusing on the gut microbiota was, remarkably, 12 900, which represents four-fifths of the total number of publications over the last 40 years that investigated this topic. This review discusses recent evidence of the impact of the gut microbiota on metabolic disorders and focus on selected key mechanisms. This review also aims to provide a critical analysis of the current knowledge in this field, identify putative key issues or problems and discuss misinterpretations. The abundance of metagenomic data generated on comparing diseased and healthy subjects can lead to the erroneous claim that a bacterium is causally linked with the protection or the onset of a disease. In fact, environmental factors such as dietary habits, drug treatments, intestinal motility and stool frequency and consistency are all factors that influence the composition of the microbiota and should be considered. The cases of the bacteria <jats:italic>Prevotella copri</jats:italic> and <jats:italic>Akkermansia muciniphila</jats:italic> will be discussed as key examples.</jats:p> 1 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2040-2448"] ["Patrice D Cani"] [] ["FP7 Ideas: European Research Council", "Fonds Baillet Latour", "Fonds De La Recherche Scientifique - FNRS", "WELBIO"] ["10.13039/100011199", "10.13039/501100010563", "10.13039/501100002661", [""]]
41 ["Therapeutic hypothermia in acute traumatic spinal cord injury"] 10.1136/jramc-2017-000792 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jramc-2017-000792 2017-10-13T00:25:27Z ["General Medicine"] 117 1 ["0035-8665", "2052-0468"] Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps <jats:p>Therapeutic hypothermia is already widely acknowledged as an effective neuroprotective intervention, especially within the acute care setting in relation to conditions such as cardiac arrest and neonatal encephalopathy. Its multifactorial mechanisms of action, including lowering metabolic rate and reducing acute inflammatory cellular processes, ultimately provide protection for central nervous tissue from continuing injury following ischaemic or traumatic insult. Its clinical application within acute traumatic spinal cord injury would therefore seem very plausible, it having the potential to combat the pathophysiological secondary injury processes that can develop in the proceeding hours to days following the initial injury. As such it could offer invaluable assistance to lessen subsequent sensory, motor and autonomic dysfunction for an individual affected by this devastating condition. Yet research surrounding this intervention’s applicability in this field is somewhat lacking, the majority being experimental. Despite a recent resurgence of interest, which in turn has produced encouraging results, there is a real possibility that this potentially transformational intervention for treating traumatic spinal cord injury could remain an experimental therapy and never reach clinical implementation.</jats:p> 1 [] ["James Collis"] [""] [""] [""]
48 ["Cancer and the emotions in 18th-century literature"] 10.1136/medhum-2018-011639 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011639 2019-11-06T22:15:31Z ["Philosophy", "Pathology and Forensic Medicine"] 0 0 ["1468-215X", "1473-4265"] Medical Humanities <jats:p>This essay argues that the emotional rhetoric of today’s breast cancer discourse—with its emphasis on stoicism and ‘positive thinking’ in the cancer patient, and its use of sympathetic feeling to encourage charitable giving—has its roots in the long 18th century. While cancer had long been connected with the emotions, 18th-century literature saw it associated with both ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ feelings, and metaphors describing jealousy, love and other sentiments as ‘like a cancer’ were used to highlight the danger of allowing feelings—even benevolent or pleasurable feelings—to flourish unchecked. As the century wore on, breast cancer in particular became an important literary device for exploring the dangers of feeling in women, with writers of both moralising treatises and sentimental novels connecting the growth or development of cancer with the indulgence of feeling, and portraying emotional self-control as the only possible form of resistance against the disease. If, as Barbara Ehrenreich suggests, today’s discourse of ‘positive thinking’ has been mobilised to make patients with breast cancer more accepting of their diagnosis and more cooperative with punitive treatment regimens, then 18th-century fictional exhortations to stay cheerful served similarly conservative political and economic purposes, encouraging continued female submission to male prerogatives inside and outside the household.</jats:p> 1 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7826-495X"] ["Noelle Gallagher"] [] ["University of Manchester"] ["10.13039/501100000770"]
81 ["British Veterinary Association Annual General Meeting Belfast, September 21, 2017"] 10.1136/vr.j3847 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/vr.j3847 2017-08-18T17:40:35Z [] 0 0 ["0042-4900", "2042-7670"] Veterinary Record <jats:p>The 2017 Annual General Meeting of the British Veterinary Association will be held at W5 at Odyssey, 2 Queen’s Quay, Belfast, Antrim, on Thursday, September 21, 2017, at 15.50.</jats:p> 1 [] ["D. Thorpe"] [""] [""] [""]
94 ["Shame-to-cynicism conversion in The Citadel and The House of God"] 10.1136/medhum-2020-011882 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2020-011882 2020-06-16T22:00:13Z ["Philosophy", "Pathology and Forensic Medicine"] 34 0 ["1468-215X", "1473-4265"] Medical Humanities <jats:p>This article considers the dynamics of shame and cynicism in A J Cronin’s <jats:italic>The Citadel</jats:italic> (1937) and Samuel Shem’s <jats:italic>The House of God</jats:italic> (1978). The protagonists of both novels are forced into shameful situations. Their response to these situations is increased cynicism. This results in a feedback loop: cynicism begets shame, which, in turn, causes more cynicism. Drawing on Bonnie Mann’s work on shame-to-power conversion, the article suggests that the novels stage a shame-to-cynicism conversion, which anticipates possible links between cynicism and shame in medical education. The overwhelming success of both novels in shaping the popular imaginary of healthcare professionals means that this dynamic, far from being isolated to the novels, might speak to shared concerns in the education scholarship.</jats:p> 1 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0817-6898"] ["Arthur Rose"] [""] [""] [""]

Advanced export

JSON shape: default, array, newline-delimited

CSV options:

CREATE TABLE [article] (
   [title] TEXT,
   [DOI] TEXT,
   [URL] TEXT,
   [created] TEXT,
   [subject] TEXT,
   [references-count] TEXT,
   [is-referenced-by-count] TEXT,
   [ISSN] TEXT,
   [container-title] TEXT,
   [abstract] TEXT,
   [author_number] TEXT,
   [orcids] TEXT,
   [names] TEXT,
   [award_numbers] TEXT,
   [funder_names] TEXT,
   [funder_dois] TEXT
);