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Link rowid title DOI URL created subject references-count ▼ is-referenced-by-count ISSN container-title abstract author_number orcids names award_numbers funder_names funder_dois
5 ["How did a Housing First intervention improve health and social outcomes among homeless adults with mental illness in Toronto? Two-year outcomes from a randomised trial"] 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010581 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010581 2016-09-13T01:49:12Z ["General Medicine"] 0 19 ["2044-6055", "2044-6055"] BMJ Open <jats:sec><jats:title>Objectives</jats:title><jats:p>We studied the impact of a Housing First (HF) intervention on housing, contact with the justice system, healthcare usage and health outcomes among At Home/Chez Soi randomised trial participants in Toronto, a city with an extensive service network for social and health services for individuals who are experiencing homelessness and mental illness.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Participants identified as high needs were randomised to receive either the intervention which provided them with housing and supports by an assertive community treatment team (HF+ACT) or treatment as usual (TAU). Participants (N=197) had in-person interviews every 3 months for 2 years.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>The HF+ACT group spent more time stably housed compared to the TAU group with the mean difference between the groups of 45.8% (95% CI 37.1% to 54.4%, p&lt;0.0001). Accounting for baseline differences, HF+ACT group showed significant improvements over TAU group for community functioning, selected quality-of-life subscales and arrests at some time points during follow-up. No differences between HF+ACT and TAU groups over the follow-up were observed for health service usage, community integration and substance use.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>HF for individuals with high levels of need increased housing stability and selected health and justice outcomes over 2 years in a city with many social and health services.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Trial registration number</jats:title><jats:p>ISRCTN42520374.</jats:p></jats:sec> 10 [] ["Patricia O'Campo", "Vicky Stergiopoulos", "Pam Nir", "Matthew Levy", "Vachan Misir", "Antony Chum", "Bouchra Arbach", "Rosane Nisenbaum", "Matthew J To", "Stephen W Hwang"] [""] [""] [""]
36 ["THE TOS2 STUDY: AN INTERNATIONAL MULTI-CENTRE AUDIT ASSESSING THE STANDARD OF NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION"] 10.1136/jnnp-2015-312379.1 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2015-312379.1 2015-10-14T18:12:15Z [] 0 2 ["0022-3050", "1468-330X"] Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry <jats:p>Having previously demonstrated that in-patients referred to neurology at two UK hospitals were not fully examined prior to referral, we designed an audit with 80% power to detect a 10% increase in tendon hammer or ophthalmoscope use following an educational intervention.</jats:p><jats:p>In-patients referred to neurology over a 4 month period in the UK, Jordan, Sweden and the United Arab Emirates were asked whether they recalled examination with a Tendon hammer, Ophthalmoscope and Stethoscope since admission. Results were disseminated to local medical teams and data were collected for a further 4 months. Pre and post-intervention data were available for 11 centres with 407 and 391 patients in each arm. 264 patients (64.86%) recalled examination with a tendon hammer pre-intervention, which significantly improved to 298 (76.21%) (p&lt;0.001). 119 (29.24%) recollected ophthalmoscopy pre-intervention, which significantly improved to 149 (38.11%) (p=0.009). 321 (78.87%) recalled examination with a stethoscope pre-intervention, which significantly improved to 330 (84.4%) (p=0.045). Most patients were not fully examined prior to neurology referral, yet a simple assessment score and educational intervention can improve the standard of neurological examination. This is the largest and – to our knowledge – only study to assess the standard of neurological examination internationally. This has implications for national neurological educators.</jats:p> 10 [] ["JP Appleton", "A Ilinca", "AG Lindgren", "A Puschmann", "M Habahbeh", "K Siddiqui", "R DeSilva", "M Jones", "R Butterworth", "DJ Nicholl"] [""] [""] [""]
96 ["What predicts regression from pre-diabetes to normal glucose regulation following a primary care nurse-delivered dietary intervention? A study protocol for a prospective cohort study"] 10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033358 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033358 2019-12-10T05:19:18Z ["General Medicine"] 0 0 ["2044-6055", "2044-6055"] BMJ Open <jats:sec><jats:title>Introduction</jats:title><jats:p>Pre-diabetes is a high-risk state for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. Regression to normoglycaemia, even if transient, significantly reduces the risk of developing T2DM. The primary aim of this mixed-methods study is to determine if there are clinically relevant differences among those with pre-diabetes and excess weight who regress to normoglycaemia, those who have persistent pre-diabetes and those who progress to T2DM following participation in a 6-month primary care nurse-delivered pre-diabetes dietary intervention. Incidence of T2DM at 2 years will be examined.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods and analysis</jats:title><jats:p>Four hundred participants with pre-diabetes (New Zealand definition glycated haemoglobin 41–49 mmol/mol) and a body mass index <jats:underline>&gt;</jats:underline>25 kg/m<jats:sup>2</jats:sup> will be recruited through eight primary care practices in Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand. Trained primary care nurses will deliver a 6-month structured dietary intervention, followed by quarterly reviews for 18 months post-intervention. Clinical data, data on lifestyle factors and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and blood samples will be collected at baseline, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months. Sixty participants purposefully selected will complete a semi-structured interview following the 6-month intervention. Poisson regression with robust standard errors and clustered by practice will be used to identify predictors of regression or progression at 6 months, and risk factors for developing T2DM at 2 years. Qualitative data will be analysed thematically. Changes in HR-QoL will be described and potential cost savings will be estimated from a funder’s perspective at 2 years.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Ethics and dissemination</jats:title><jats:p>This study was approved by the Northern A Health and Disability Ethics Committee, New Zealand (Ethics Reference: 17/NTA/24).… 10 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0996-2874"] ["Kirsten Coppell", "Trish Freer", "Sally Abel", "Lisa Whitehead", "David Tipene-Leach", "Andrew R Gray", "Tony Merriman", "Trudy Sullivan", "Jeremy Krebs", "Leigh Perreault"] ["16/344"] ["Health Research Council of New Zealand"] ["10.13039/501100001505"]
21 ["Association between frontal plane knee control and lower extremity injuries: a prospective study on young team sport athletes"] 10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000311 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000311 2018-01-14T01:10:19Z [] 47 6 ["2055-7647"] BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine <jats:sec><jats:title>Background/aim</jats:title><jats:p>Poor frontal plane knee control can manifest as increased dynamic knee valgus during athletic tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between frontal plane knee control and the risk of acute lower extremity injuries. In addition, we wanted to study if the single-leg squat (SLS) test can be used as a screening tool to identify athletes with an increased injury risk.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>A total of 306 basketball and floorball players participated in the baseline SLS test and a 12-month injury registration follow-up. Acute lower extremity time-loss injuries were registered. Frontal plane knee projection angles (FPKPA) during the SLS were calculated using a two-dimensional video analysis.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Athletes displaying a high FPKPA were 2.7 times more likely to sustain a lower extremity injury (adjusted OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.23 to 5.83) and 2.4 times more likely to sustain an ankle injury (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.13 to 4.98). There was no statistically significant association between FPKPA and knee injury (OR 1.49, 95% CI 0.56 to 3.98). The receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated poor combined sensitivity and specificity when FPKPA was used as a screening test for lower extremity injuries (area under the curve of 0.59) and ankle injuries (area under the curve of 0.58).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Athletes displaying a large FPKPA in the SLS test had an elevated risk of acute lower extremity and ankle injuries. However, the SLS test is not sensitive and specific enough to be used as a screening tool for future injury risk.</jats:p></jats:sec> 10 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3056-8169"] ["Anu M R\u00e4is\u00e4nen", "Kati Pasanen", "Tron Krosshaug", "Tommi Vasankari", "Pekka Kannus", "Ari Heinonen", "Urho M Kujala", "Janne Avela", "Jarmo Perttunen", "Jari Parkkari"] [] ["The Foundation of Sports Institute", "the Competitive State Research Financing of The Expert Responsibility Area of Tampere University Hospital", "The Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture"] [[""], [""], [""]]
2 ["Efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: a systematic literature review informing the 2013 update of the EULAR recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis"] 10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204577 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-204577 2014-01-08T03:37:11Z ["Immunology", "General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology", "Immunology and Allergy", "Rheumatology"] 89 199 ["0003-4967", "1468-2060"] Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases <jats:sec><jats:title>Objectives</jats:title><jats:p>To update the evidence for the efficacy of biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to inform the European League Against Rheumatism(EULAR) Task Force treatment recommendations.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for articles published between January 2009 and February 2013 on infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, certolizumab-pegol, golimumab, anakinra, abatacept, rituximab, tocilizumab and biosimilar DMARDs (bsDMARDs) in phase 3 development. Abstracts from 2011 to 2012 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2011–2013 EULAR conferences were obtained.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Fifty-one full papers, and 57 abstracts were identified. The randomised controlled trials (RCT) confirmed the efficacy of bDMARD+conventional synthetic DMARDs (csDMARDs) versus csDMARDs alone (level 1B evidence). There was some additional evidence for the use of bDMARD monotherapy, however bDMARD and MTX combination therapy for all bDMARD classes was more efficacious (1B). Clinical and radiographic responses were high with treat-to-target strategies. Earlier improvement in signs and symptoms were seen with more intensive initial treatment strategies, but outcomes were similar upon addition of bDMARDs in patients with insufficient response to MTX. In general, radiographic progression was lower with bDMARD use, mainly due to initial treatment effects. Although patients may achieve bDMARD- and drug-free remission, maintenance of clinical responses was higher with bDMARD continuation (1B), but bDMARD dose reduction could be applied (1B). There was still no RCT data for bDMARD switching.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>The systematic literature review confirms efficacy of biological DMARDs in RA. It addresses different treatment strategies with the potential for re… 10 [] ["Jackie L Nam", "Sofia Ramiro", "Cecile Gaujoux-Viala", "Kaoru Takase", "Mario Leon-Garcia", "Paul Emery", "Laure Gossec", "Robert Landewe", "Josef S Smolen", "Maya H Buch"] [""] [""] [""]
32 ["Medication-related harm in older adults following hospital discharge: development and validation of a prediction tool"] 10.1136/bmjqs-2019-009587 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2019-009587 2019-09-16T21:15:37Z [] 94 2 ["2044-5415", "2044-5423"] BMJ Quality & Safety <jats:sec><jats:title>Objectives</jats:title><jats:p>To develop and validate a tool to predict the risk of an older adult experiencing medication-related harm (MRH) requiring healthcare use following hospital discharge.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Design, setting, participants</jats:title><jats:p>Multicentre, prospective cohort study recruiting older adults (≥65 years) discharged from five UK teaching hospitals between 2013 and 2015.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Primary outcome measure</jats:title><jats:p>Participants were followed up for 8 weeks in the community by senior pharmacists to identify MRH (adverse drug reactions, harm from non-adherence, harm from medication error). Three data sources provided MRH and healthcare use information: hospital readmissions, primary care use, participant telephone interview. Candidate variables for prognostic modelling were selected using two systematic reviews, the views of patients with MRH and an expert panel of clinicians. Multivariable logistic regression with backward elimination, based on the Akaike Information Criterion, was used to develop the PRIME tool. The tool was internally validated.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>1116 out of 1280 recruited participants completed follow-up (87%). Uncertain MRH cases (‘possible’ and ‘probable’) were excluded, leaving a tool derivation cohort of 818. 119 (15%) participants experienced ‘definite’ MRH requiring healthcare use and 699 participants did not. Modelling resulted in a prediction tool with eight variables measured at hospital discharge: age, gender, antiplatelet drug, sodium level, antidiabetic drug, past adverse drug reaction, number of medicines, living alone. The tool’s discrimination C-statistic was 0.69 (0.66 after validation) and showed good calibration. Decision curve analysis demonstrated the potential value of the tool to guide clinical decision making compared with alternative approaches.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:ti… 10 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9988-3717"] ["Nikesh Parekh", "Khalid Ali", "John Graham Davies", "Jennifer M Stevenson", "Winston Banya", "Stephen Nyangoma", "Rebekah Schiff", "Tischa van der Cammen", "Jatinder Harchowal", "Chakravarthi Rajkumar"] ["PB-PG-0711-25094"] ["National Institute for Health Research"] ["10.13039/501100000272"]

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CREATE TABLE [article] (
   [title] TEXT,
   [DOI] TEXT,
   [URL] TEXT,
   [created] TEXT,
   [subject] TEXT,
   [references-count] TEXT,
   [is-referenced-by-count] TEXT,
   [ISSN] TEXT,
   [container-title] TEXT,
   [abstract] TEXT,
   [author_number] TEXT,
   [orcids] TEXT,
   [names] TEXT,
   [award_numbers] TEXT,
   [funder_names] TEXT,
   [funder_dois] TEXT
);