2 rows where author_number = 12 sorted by award_numbers

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Link rowid title DOI URL created subject references-count is-referenced-by-count ISSN container-title abstract author_number orcids names award_numbers ▼ funder_names funder_dois
37 ["Palliative care research centre's move into social media: constructing a framework for ethical research, a consensus paper"] 10.1136/bmjspcare-2015-000889 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2015-000889 2016-01-29T03:54:13Z ["Medicine (miscellaneous)", "Oncology(nursing)", "Medical\u2013Surgical", "General Medicine"] 13 2 ["2045-435X", "2045-4368"] BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care <jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>Social media (SM) have altered the way we live and, for many, the way we die. The information available on even the rarest conditions is vast. Free from restrictions of mobility, time and distance, SM provides a space for people to share experiences of illness, death and dying, and potentially benefit from the emotional and practical support of others n similar positions. The communications that take place in these spaces also create large amounts of ‘data’ which, for any research centre, cannot be ignored. However, for a palliative care research centre the use of this ‘data’ comes with specific ethical dilemmas.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>This paper details the process that we, as a research, went through in constructing a set of ethical guidelines by which to work. This involved conducting two consensus days; one with researchers from within the centre, and one with the inclusion of external researchers with a specific interest in SM.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>The primary themes that emerged from the consensus meetings includes; SM as a public or private space; the status of open and closed groups; the use of historical data; recruiting participants and obtaining informed consent and problems of anonymity associated with dissemination.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>These are the themes that this paper will focus on prior to setting out the guidelines that we subsequently constructed.</jats:p></jats:sec> 12 [] ["Noreen Hopewell-Kelly", "Jessica Baillie", "Stephanie Sivell", "Emily Harrop", "Anna Bowyer", "Sophia Taylor", "Kristen Thomas", "Alisha Newman", "Hayley Prout", "Anthony Byrne", "Mark Taubert", "Annmarie Nelson"] [""] [""] [""]
98 ["Children with chronic health disorders travelling to the tropics: a prospective observational study"] 10.1136/archdischild-2015-309436 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2015-309436 2016-06-11T04:55:23Z ["Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health"] 19 0 ["0003-9888", "1468-2044"] Archives of Disease in Childhood <jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>The number of trips to the tropics taken by children with chronic health disorders (CHDs) is increasing.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>All of the children with CHDs who attended two international vaccination centres in France before travelling to the tropics were included in a prospective, exposed/unexposed study. Each child was age-matched with two control children and followed for 1 month after returning from the tropics.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Fifty-six children with CHDs and 107 control children were included. The children's median age was 6 years old (IQR 2–11). Of the study participants, 127/163 (78%) travelled to West Africa, mainly to visit relatives. The median duration of the stay was 42 days (IQR 31–55). The age of the children, the destination and the duration of the trip were similar between the two groups. Sickle cell disease (23/56) and asthma (16/56) were the most common CHDs. Overall, the children with CHDs experienced more clinical events than the control patients did (p&lt;0.05); however, there was no difference when chronic disease exacerbations were excluded (p=0.64) or when only the period abroad was considered (p=0.24). One child with a recent genetic diagnosis of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome died from a first disease exacerbation.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>Health problems among children with CHDs travelling abroad are mainly related to chronic disease exacerbations, which mostly occur after the children return. Patients with diseases that require highly specialised care for an exacerbation should avoid travelling to resource-limited tropical countries.</jats:p></jats:sec> 12 [] ["Camille Ducrocq", "Julie Sommet", "Dora Levy", "Thanh-Van Trieu", "Fabrice Quercia", "Laurence Morin", "Xavier Belletre", "B\u00e9reng\u00e8re Koehl", "Frederic Sorge", "Corinne Alberti", "Loic de Pontual", "Albert Faye"] [""] [""] [""]

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CREATE TABLE [article] (
   [title] TEXT,
   [DOI] TEXT,
   [URL] TEXT,
   [created] TEXT,
   [subject] TEXT,
   [references-count] TEXT,
   [is-referenced-by-count] TEXT,
   [ISSN] TEXT,
   [container-title] TEXT,
   [abstract] TEXT,
   [author_number] TEXT,
   [orcids] TEXT,
   [names] TEXT,
   [award_numbers] TEXT,
   [funder_names] TEXT,
   [funder_dois] TEXT
);