2 rows where ISSN contains "1468-215X" sorted by ISSN

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Link rowid title DOI URL created subject references-count is-referenced-by-count ISSN ▼ container-title abstract author_number orcids names award_numbers funder_names funder_dois
48 ["Cancer and the emotions in 18th-century literature"] 10.1136/medhum-2018-011639 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011639 2019-11-06T22:15:31Z ["Philosophy", "Pathology and Forensic Medicine"] 0 0 ["1468-215X", "1473-4265"] Medical Humanities <jats:p>This essay argues that the emotional rhetoric of today’s breast cancer discourse—with its emphasis on stoicism and ‘positive thinking’ in the cancer patient, and its use of sympathetic feeling to encourage charitable giving—has its roots in the long 18th century. While cancer had long been connected with the emotions, 18th-century literature saw it associated with both ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ feelings, and metaphors describing jealousy, love and other sentiments as ‘like a cancer’ were used to highlight the danger of allowing feelings—even benevolent or pleasurable feelings—to flourish unchecked. As the century wore on, breast cancer in particular became an important literary device for exploring the dangers of feeling in women, with writers of both moralising treatises and sentimental novels connecting the growth or development of cancer with the indulgence of feeling, and portraying emotional self-control as the only possible form of resistance against the disease. If, as Barbara Ehrenreich suggests, today’s discourse of ‘positive thinking’ has been mobilised to make patients with breast cancer more accepting of their diagnosis and more cooperative with punitive treatment regimens, then 18th-century fictional exhortations to stay cheerful served similarly conservative political and economic purposes, encouraging continued female submission to male prerogatives inside and outside the household.</jats:p> 1 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7826-495X"] ["Noelle Gallagher"] [] ["University of Manchester"] ["10.13039/501100000770"]
94 ["Shame-to-cynicism conversion in The Citadel and The House of God"] 10.1136/medhum-2020-011882 http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2020-011882 2020-06-16T22:00:13Z ["Philosophy", "Pathology and Forensic Medicine"] 34 0 ["1468-215X", "1473-4265"] Medical Humanities <jats:p>This article considers the dynamics of shame and cynicism in A J Cronin’s <jats:italic>The Citadel</jats:italic> (1937) and Samuel Shem’s <jats:italic>The House of God</jats:italic> (1978). The protagonists of both novels are forced into shameful situations. Their response to these situations is increased cynicism. This results in a feedback loop: cynicism begets shame, which, in turn, causes more cynicism. Drawing on Bonnie Mann’s work on shame-to-power conversion, the article suggests that the novels stage a shame-to-cynicism conversion, which anticipates possible links between cynicism and shame in medical education. The overwhelming success of both novels in shaping the popular imaginary of healthcare professionals means that this dynamic, far from being isolated to the novels, might speak to shared concerns in the education scholarship.</jats:p> 1 ["http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0817-6898"] ["Arthur Rose"] [""] [""] [""]

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CREATE TABLE [article] (
   [title] TEXT,
   [DOI] TEXT,
   [URL] TEXT,
   [created] TEXT,
   [subject] TEXT,
   [references-count] TEXT,
   [is-referenced-by-count] TEXT,
   [ISSN] TEXT,
   [container-title] TEXT,
   [abstract] TEXT,
   [author_number] TEXT,
   [orcids] TEXT,
   [names] TEXT,
   [award_numbers] TEXT,
   [funder_names] TEXT,
   [funder_dois] TEXT
);